Donte Collins – “Long Story Short”


Featuring at Honey in Minneapolis

“someone who is dead now taught you how best to clean up your blood. then how to clean up blood when it is not your own.”

Don’t miss this marvelous poem from Donte Collins, featuring at his book release show at Honey in Minneapolis.

Get your hands on a copy of Donte’s incredible book, AUTOPSY, now available!



While you’re here, head over to the Button store to check out our books and merch, including books by Olivia Gatwood, Hanif Abdurraqib, Donte Collins, Sabrina Benaim, Melissa Lozada-Oliva, William Evans, Guante, Rachel Wiley, & our newest release from Neil Hilborn!

In-Depth Look: Bianca Phipps – “When the Boy Says He Loves My Body”

In-Depth Look: Bianca Phipps – “When the Boy Says He Loves My Body”

Appreciating poetry is often about patience: sitting with a poem, meditating on it, and re-reading it multiple times. With spoken word, we don’t always get a chance to do that. This series is about taking that chance, and diving a little deeper into some of the new poems going up on Button.

“I find my body is a locked door. I find I locked myself out.”

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Write-up by Kyle “Guante” Tran Myhre


Get Guante’s Book Here
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This whole series is built around the idea of “sitting with a poem, meditating on it, and re-reading it multiple times” in order to come to a deeper understanding of and appreciation for that poem. That process, however, is so much bigger than poetry. The basic idea of thinking more critically about our language, our actions, our culture– everything– is valuable whether or not you have any interest in writing and performing poems.

This piece captures some of why that is. The entire poem is built around a “catalyst moment:” there is an action (when the boy says he loves my body, but does not say he loves me), and a reaction. That reaction is full of imagery, metaphor, and a deeper analysis of the catalyst, even if nothing really “happens” on a literal level– the poem is a meditation, an opportunity to cultivate within ourselves a fuller understanding of that line that kicks everything off.

Some of my favorite poems are built like this– give us a scenario that does not at all seem special, and then illuminate why it is special. Give us a “simple” image, and then show us its complexity. In this poem’s case, give us a “throwaway” bit of dialogue (as something like this catalyst statement could potentially be interpreted, at least by its speaker), and then explore its layers, its nuance, its impact.

For more from Bianca Phipps: Facebook | Twitter

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While you’re here, head over to the Button store to check out our books and merch, including books by Neil Hilborn, Olivia Gatwood, Hanif Abdurraqib, Donte Collins, Sabrina Benaim, Melissa Lozada-Oliva, William Evans, Guante, Rachel Wiley, & our newest release from Neil Hilborn!

Guante – “Thoughts & Prayers”


Featuring at Icehouse in Minneapolis

“When we win, it will not be because we have convinced our enemies to love us. It will be because we have beaten them.”

Don’t miss this powerful poem from Guante, featuring at his book release show at Icehouse in Minneapolis.

Get your hands on a copy of Guante’s incredible book, A LOVE SONG, A DEATH RATTLE, A BATTLE CRY, now available!



While you’re here, head over to the Button store to check out our books and merch, including books by Olivia Gatwood, Hanif Abdurraqib, Donte Collins, Sabrina Benaim, Melissa Lozada-Oliva, William Evans, Guante, Rachel Wiley, & our newest release from Neil Hilborn!

Ariana Brown – “Passage”

Featuring at Intermedia Arts.

“No one should need a piece of paper to prove they belong.”

Don’t miss this amazing poem from Ariana Brown, performing at Intermedia Arts in Minneapolis, MN.

While you’re here, head over to the Button store to check out our books and merch, including books by Olivia Gatwood, Hanif Abdurraqib, Donte Collins, Sabrina Benaim, Melissa Lozada-Oliva, William Evans, Guante, Rachel Wiley, & our newest release from Neil Hilborn!

Rachel McKibbens – “Poem Written with a Sawed Off Typewriter”


Performing at the 2017 Rustbelt Poetry Festival.

“I have never had a mother, or no longer, or once did, briefly, for a day or two.”

Don’t miss this remarkable poem from Rachel McKibbens, performing at the 2017 Rustbelt Poetry Festival.



While you’re here, head over to the Button store to check out our books and merch, including books by Olivia Gatwood, Hanif Abdurraqib, Donte Collins, Sabrina Benaim, Melissa Lozada-Oliva, William Evans, Guante, Rachel Wiley, & our newest release from Neil Hilborn!

Ephraim Nehemiah – “5 Stages of Grief for the Living”


Performing at the 2017 Rustbelt Poetry Festival.

“I do not fear that grief will make itself a home within me.”

Don’t miss this heartbreaking poem from Ephraim Nehemiah, performing at the 2017 Rustbelt Poetry Festival.



While you’re here, head over to the Button store to check out our books and merch, including books by Olivia Gatwood, Hanif Abdurraqib, Donte Collins, Sabrina Benaim, Melissa Lozada-Oliva, William Evans, Guante, Rachel Wiley, & our newest release from Neil Hilborn!

Patrick Roche – “Mother’s Prayers”


Performing at the 2017 Rustbelt Poetry Festival.

“I wait in line at the pharmacy counter to pick up the refills for my anti-depressants, and prominently placed right next to the counter is a five-foot display of religious books promising a happy fulfilled life through prayer. I should’ve known. I should have known my mother would follow me in here like that.”

Don’t miss this breathtaking poem from Patrick Roche, performing at the 2017 Rustbelt Poetry Festival.



While you’re here, head over to the Button store to check out our books and merch, including books by Olivia Gatwood, Hanif Abdurraqib, Donte Collins, Sabrina Benaim, Melissa Lozada-Oliva, William Evans, Guante, Rachel Wiley, & our newest release from Neil Hilborn!

Rachel Wiley – “When We Were Kings” (Button Live)


Featuring at Button Poetry Live.

“My niece is 8 and skipping pizza day because all of a sudden worried if she’s thin enough to be a queen or pretty enough to be someone’s trophy.”

Don’t miss this impeccable poem from Rachel Wiley, featuring at Button Poetry Live.

Check out Rachel’s newest book, NOTHING IS OKAY, now available!



While you’re here, head over to the Button store to check out our books and merch, including books by Neil Hilborn, Olivia Gatwood, Hanif Abdurraqib, Donte Collins, Sabrina Benaim, Melissa Lozada-Oliva, William Evans, Guante, Rachel Wiley, & our newest release from Neil Hilborn!

Raych Jackson – “Seven Thoughts on Job and Depression”


Performing at the 2017 Rustbelt Poetry Festival.

“‘God makes no mistakes’ is the string that keeps us tied to him.”

Don’t miss this marvelous poem from Raych Jackson, performing at the 2017 Rustbelt Poetry Festival.



While you’re here, head over to the Button store to check out our books and merch, including books by Olivia Gatwood, Hanif Abdurraqib, Donte Collins, Sabrina Benaim, Melissa Lozada-Oliva, William Evans, Guante, Rachel Wiley, & our newest release from Neil Hilborn!

In-Depth Look: Isha Camara – “Loudest Burial”

In-Depth Look: Isha Camara – “Loudest Burial”

Appreciating poetry is often about patience: sitting with a poem, meditating on it, and re-reading it multiple times. With spoken word, we don’t always get a chance to do that. This series is about taking that chance, and diving a little deeper into some of the new poems going up on Button.

“Eye for an eye? More like tooth for whole skull.”

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Write-up by Kyle “Guante” Tran Myhre


Get Guante’s Book Here
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The stereotype about spoken word is that it’s all “big,” capital-P Political Poems, and there is some truth in that. When the stage is one of the only public forums we have to discuss the things that we care about, it’s only natural that it becomes a platform for work that engages with the world. That stereotype, however, often seems to be framed negatively, as though “political poems” were inherently hollow, just “ranting and raving” without any craft or heart.

This poem is a great counterpoint to that, showing how a poem can be both explicitly political and very much grounded, concrete, and human. From “the hands of your loved ones,” to a mother’s voice, to a clear-eyed view of Obama’s legacy, this isn’t a poem about “those people over there,” a stumble that some attempts at political poetry make; the poem finds a way to comment on world events through the lens of personal experience.

In “Why Authoritarians Attack the Arts,” scholar and poet Eve Ewing writes: “Art creates pathways for subversion, for political understanding and solidarity among coalition builders. Art teaches us that lives other than our own have value.” I’m hearing this poem in that context; the work that this poem is doing is important, and is work that we (especially those of us who are poets) can and should contribute to as well.

Hear another one of Isha Camara’s poems here!

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While you’re here, head over to the Button store to check out our books and merch, including books by Neil Hilborn, Olivia Gatwood, Hanif Abdurraqib, Donte Collins, Sabrina Benaim, Melissa Lozada-Oliva, William Evans, Guante, Rachel Wiley, & our newest release from Neil Hilborn!